Stalking Under the Hunter’s Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

This October provided a gorgeous setting for a beautiful full moon. I was staring at the clouds instead of writing my newsletter. This month we explore the goddess of the hunt, the science behind the color of autumn, and go down the rabbit hole on fingerprints.



Image Credit: Aubrey Gemignani/NASA

Space.com curated a collection of specular photos of this month’s moon, including the featured image by Aubrey Gemignani. The Hunter’s moon takes my mind to the Greek goddess Artemis. The goddess of the hunt, moon, and chastity, Artemis was the daughter of Zeus and Leto. Zeus’s wife, Hera, not at all pleased with her husband’s infidelity (again!) went after Leto because, well, her husband was Zeus. Hera took her revenge by forbidding Leto from giving birth anywhere on solid earth. And so Leto gave birth to Artemis while she balanced on an olive branch! Hera railed at being outsmarted. Hera’s daughter, Eileithyia (no idea how you say it), was the goddess of childbirth. (Here I thought the goddess of childbirth was Epidural). Hera forbade Eileithyia from helping Leto birth her son, Apollo. Artemis, at nine days old, helped deliver her twin brother. Talk about being gifted and talented. Spectacular!

Learn more about Artemis


Read the De La Cruz Series series.

The third casefile for Cleveland homicide detective Jesus De La Cruz is set to release in February 2022. That gives you plenty of time to catch up with Cruz, Yablonski, and Aurora before starting their next adventure.

#1 A serial killer is targeting drug dealers. Cruz puts his neck on the line to create the break and stop a killer some are cheering on.

From Down & Out Books. Amazon Link

#2 A young woman is in a coma. Two 9-1-1 calls point to murder and put Cruz on the trail of an assailant with a taste for revenge.

From Down & Out Books. Amazon Link

#3 An up-and-coming accountant is killed in a hit and run. Cruz searches his past, present, and future for a ice cold killer

From Down & Out Books. February 2022


Down the Rabbit Hole: Finger Prints

This month, I’ve been working on the adaptation for M2D4 Season 3Episode 7. This story The Red Thumb Mark, by R. Austin Freeman was published in 1907. A story of fiction, it was written at a dynamic time of science and discovery, documenting progress in action. This is first case for the British medical investigator Dr. John Thorndyke was working for the defense on what appears to be an open-and-shut case. A business man locks diamonds in his safe with a receipt. In the morning, the diamonds are gone and on the receipt is a red thumbprint. Which made me curious about fingerprints…and down the rabbit hole we go…

Click HERE to read the full article


The Painted Month

One of my favorite things about living in the Great Lakes region is that each month has a different feel. October is a most comfortable month, a beautiful month, thanks to the colorful theatrical display put on by the leaves. But, what makes the leaves change color?

Click HERE to get the magic on

BTW, I love the picture of this woman. It makes me want to rake up a pile and leaves and jump in!


Welcome to Mysteries to Die For

Mysteries to Die For. Season 3: Enter the Detective

Mysteries to Die For Season 3 is in full swing! This season is titled Enter the Detective. Each of the 11 episodes features the first case of a detective who went on to an illustrious career. Some you know by a single word: Holmes, Poirot, Chan. Others may be new to you but were cutting edge and set the standard for our modern day detectives.

New to podcasts? An easy way to start is through my website. Click PODCAST

New York Detective Ebenezer Gryce is called in to solve the murder of Horatio Leavenworth. Alone in the room, all doors are locked, it’s a clear case of murder.

Dropped October 22

A man is found dead in an empty room. He wasn’t shot. He wasn’t stabbed. He wasn’t strangled. This is a case for the one and only Sherlock Holmes.

Dropping November 5

In the posh home at Lenton Croft, visiting ladies are losing their jewels. When Scotland Yard is stymied, the calls goes out the expert Martin Hewitt.

Dropping November 19


Support comes in a lot of shapes and sizes. Down & Out Books and imprint All Due Respect support my books and podcast. Help me support them back. I am very proud to recommended these new releases to your reading pile, smart phone, or Kindle. It doesn’t matter how you read…just read!

Sonny Cantone’s having a really bad day. Wait until he sees the next 24 hours… From Greg F. Gifune, author of DANGEROUS BOYS and THE BLEEDING SEASON, comes VELVET ELVIS. Set in one hot and crazy night, and populated with hard drinking, pot smoking ex-cons, shady strippers, aging mobsters, crooked cops and sociopathic drug lords, VELVET ELVIS is one man’s dark and sometimes darkly comic descent into madness and mayhem.

Buy, download, and read Greg F. Gifune’s VELVET ELVIS. From publisher Down & Out Books.

Amazon Link to give Sonny a hand.

ALL THE GOOD IN EVIL tells the story of Amos Swain and his attempt for redemption. The more he tries, the more enemies he creates. As an enemy maelstrom circles around him, a betrayal he’d never imagined drags him deeper into chaos until the only redemption he can find is a little good in evil.

Buy, download, and read Joe Ricker and his awesomely titled ALL THE GOOD IN EVIL. From publisher Down & Out Books.

Amazon Link to support Amos Swain’s redemption.


Mysteries and thrillers from mainstream publishers leave you feeling like you kissed your best friend?

Then you are ready to step down to Down & Out Books.

Mystery, thrillers and true crime. Gritty. Hard core. Obscure. Twisted. Imaginative. Fantastic. Stories the way you like them.

Discover your next amazing read at Downandoutbooks.com and your favorite social media site.


The Beaver Moon chews up November, cresting on the 19th. Will I be On the Prowl on time? Stay Tuned!


Down the Rabbit Hole: Fingerprints

The first case for the British medical investigator Dr. John Thorndyke was working for the defense on what appears to be an open-and-shut case. A business man locks diamonds in his safe with a receipt. In the morning, the diamonds are gone and on the receipt is a red thumbprint. This story The Red Thumb Mark, by R. Austin Freeman was published in 1907. A story of fiction, it was written at a dynamic time of science and discovery, documenting progress in action.

Various articles reference the fact that ancient cultures recognized the difference in fingerprints but it wasn’t until the 1800s that the modern era of fingerprinting began. Britannica.com and The Fingerprint Sourcebook were two of my favorite sources. Hermann Welcker, Henry Faulds, and William James Herschel were the leaders in describing fingerprints. Sir Francis Galton built on their work, suggesting the first system for classifying fingerprints based on the common elements. His work, in turn, was used by Sir Edward R. Henry and Juan Vucetick to develop classification systems. Henry’s approach was adopted by Scotland Yard in the early 1900s and was widespread across English-speaking countries. Vucetick, from Argentina, published his system in the same time frame, which was widely adopted across Spanish-speaking countries. How complicated are fingerprints? The biometric company Touch N Go has one of the easiest to understand presentation of the common fingerprint patterns with pictures.

In the story The Red Thumb Mark, Thorndyke is faced with evidence that seems incontrovertible. He theorizes the print does belong to the suspect, but the print itself is a forgery, a fake. Funny enough, the method described in a story written in 1905 isn’t all that different from the one I found on the website WikiHow.

The Painted Month

One of my favorite things about living in the Great Lakes region is that each month has a different feel. October is a most comfortable month, a beautiful month, thanks to the colorful theatrical display put on by the leaves. But, what makes the leaves change color?

According to SciJinks, a website developed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, it comes down to sunlight. When sunlight is abundant, leaves make chlorophyll in abundance and it is chlorophyll that makes leaves green. When the days shorten and sunlight decreases, the other pigments are able to push the front. Yellows from xanthophylls, oranges from carotenoids, and reds from anthocyanins. Temperature and water play a role in when the leaves change and how long the colors stay, but then, those of us who see this annual display know that.

Tumbling under the Harvest Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

Did you get to see that beautiful moon on the 20th? While I was not able to pull this newsletter together on time, I did get outside that evening to gaze up at a moon that glowed like an LED light. My 5 month old puppies, Kane and Skye, wrestled on the moonlight dappled grass. A sight impossible to photograph. The photo below was captured in daylight (obviously) by my husband when our bundles of fur were a bit younger.

Skye and Kane no holds barred in the back yard


<a href="Copyright: <a href='https://www.123rf.com/profile_sakai000'>sakai000
Autumn images sky and full moon

It doesn’t take imagination to understand how the Harvest Moon got its name. Here’s a link to our favorite source, The Farmer’s Almanac, if you want the official background. Taking a page from Kane and Skye, let’s be more playful. Looking around my world, if I were to name the moon today, I would call it….

The Spider Moon. Charlotte isn’t the only on spinning her web this September. There are spider webs in my shrubs, in the grass, in our woods, and between our house and our hockey goal. This last was spectacular and I tried to take a picture for you…but it didn’t work. A heavy rain last week undid the spider’s hard work and he has yet to rebuild.

The Concert F Moon. It is marching band season here in Indiana. The marching band Jack (of Mysteries to Die For fame) is in uses Concert F for tuning the band. I hadn’t known marching band was sport until moving to Indiana. The hours these kids, director and techs, and volunteers put in is a cause for applause.

The Pigskin Moon. Nothing screams it’s fall like football. Since the mid-1970s, footballs have been made from cow hide instead of pig but it’s nice that we keep the outdated tech reference. It’s sort like saying “change the dial” on anything today.

I want to know, if you named the moon based on your life, what would it be? Email me at tina at tgwolff.com.


Read the first in my series.

De La Cruz Case Files

From Down & Out Books. Amazon Link

Diamond Mysteries

From Down & Out Books. Amazon Link

Romantic Suspense – Lost In Series

From Entangled Publishing. Amazon Link


Down the Rabbit Hole: Exchanging American Dollars…or American Dollars

A one dollar bill from Citizen’s Bank of Louisiana

Episode 3 in Season 3 of Mysteries to Die For is an adaptation of the Allan Pinkerton Story “The Detective and the Expressman.” This story may be the first financial mystery. Written about a Pinkerton case in 1858, the story is the investigation into the misappropriation of $50,000 from the Adams Express Company. One of the things I enjoy about reading these original mysteries is the casual, everyday look into normal life. Sometimes, though, it is challenging to understand because our life today can be so very different. In this case, let’s talk about money.

Throughout the story, there are several references to various characters having to “change money.” Today, we certainly have to change money when we travel to other countries. You can’t use a ten dollar bill in London. You can’t use a 10 euro note in the states. You have to exchange one currency to another – or use a credit card in which a bank will do it for you in the background for a nice (not nice) fee.

But this story takes place in the United States, such as it was in the 1850s (31 states plus four territories). The story begins in Montgomery, Alabama and includes activities in New Orleans, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and New York. So why were these characters “changing money”? Click HERE to read the full article


Sights and Sounds: South Haven, Michigan. A Great Spot on a Great Lake One of the fun things about being an author is exploring new places and then bringing those places to life on a page. People who live there or visited get a little thrill recognizing the places they came to cherish. People new to the places get to explore and make a new entry to their bucket list. In the 3rd book of the Diamond series, Diamond tracks a witness to the lake town of South Haven, Michigan. South Haven is located at the mouth of the Black River and Lake Michigan. Her +/- 4,400 residents love everything water, beach, and fishing. According to the LindyLou captain, South Haven has been a vacation spot for Midwesterners since the 1800s. Click HERE to read the full story.


Welcome to Mysteries to Die For

Mysteries to Die For. Season 3: Enter the Detective

Mysteries to Die For Season 3 has arrived! This season is titled Enter the Detective. Each of the 11 episodes features the first case of a detective who went on to an illustrious career. Some you know by a single word: Holmes, Poirot, Chan. Others may be new to you but were cutting edge and set the standard for our modern day detectives. Episodes 1 and 2 are live! Episode 3 drops on October 8. Jack and I recorded it this morning. Oh, boy, ragweed was messing with my throat.

New to podcasts? An easy way to start is through my website. Click PODCAST

A woman of high esteem is being blackmailed. She turns to the head of the Paris police for the return of her purloined letter. He turns to the first master detective – C. Auguste Dupin.

The young, beautiful Countess de Tremoral is found murdered on the banks of the Seine River. Her home has been ransacked but the only thing missing…is her husband.

Episode 3 Pinkerton’s The Expressman and The Detective

Dropping October 8

It was daring plot. Two thefts, months apart, leave the Adams Express Company missing $50,000. The company turns to the original private eye, Allan Pinkerton, for answers.


Our podcast is supported by my publisher, Down & Out Books. I am very proud to recommended these new releases to your reading pile, smart phone, or Kindle. It doesn’t matter how you read…just read!

In the psychological suspense thriller Stalker Stalked, Lexi Mazur learns the only way to beat her stalker is to use her own stalking prowess to turn the game back around. That’s her plan, but has she finally met her match? 

Buy, download, and read Stalker Stalked by Lee Matthew Goldberg. From publisher All Due Respect.

Amazon Link, show Lee some love!

Steve Harrison, thirty-five years old, handsome, has the world in his hands.  He is admired by his co-workers, his friends, his wife, and his mistress. And then he gets a call. “Bill” informs him that his wife has been kidnapped and if Steve wants her back alive, he has to do exactly what he says.  If Steve deviates from Bill’s plan, tries going to the police, or tries to involve others, his wife won’t be breathing when he brings her home.

Buy, download, and read Person Unknown by Michael Penncavage. From publisher Down & Out Books.

Releases on October 8. Pre-Order NOW! Buy Direct from D&O HERE


Mysteries and thrillers from mainstream publishers leave you feeling like you kissed your best friend?

Then you are ready to step down to Down & Out Books.

Mystery, thrillers and true crime. Gritty. Hard core. Obscure. Twisted. Imaginative. Fantastic. Stories the way you like them.

Discover your next amazing read at Downandoutbooks.com and your favorite social media site.


Take the time to watch the leaves turn until we meet under October’s Hunter’s Moon


The Rabbit Hole: Your Bank or Mine?

Episode 3 in Season 3 of Mysteries to Die For is an adaptation of the Allan Pinkerton Story “The Detective and the Expressman.” This story may be the first financial mystery – don’t quote me, my research hasn’t been exhaustive. Written about a Pinkerton case from 1858, the story is the investigation into the misappropriation of $50,000 from the Adams Express Company. One of the things I enjoy about reading these original mysteries is the casual, everyday look into normal life. Sometimes, though, it is challenging to understand because our life today can be so very different, as in this case. Let’s talk about money.

Throughout the story, there are several references to various characters having to “change money.” Today, we certainly have to change money when we travel to other countries. You can’t use a ten dollar bill in London. You can’t use a 20 euro note in the states. You have to exchange one currency to another – or use a credit card in which a bank will do it for you in the background for a nice (not nice) fee.

But this story takes place in the United States, such as it was in the 1850s (31 states plus four territories). The story begins in Montgomery, Alabama and includes activities in New Orleans, Atlanta, Philadelphia, and New York. So why were these characters “changing money”?

Follow me down the rabbit hole.

In 1863, two laws were passed that created a national baking system and a single currency. Seeing as we became a country in 1776…what were we using for money for the almost 100 years in between? The US Constitution granted the federal government the sole power to coin money and regulate its value. Coin money. Not paper money. Coin money was made out of metal and held tangible value. Paper money, by contrast, was shown through the American Revolution to lack that stability.

And so, the issuance of paper money was the business of state-chartered, private banks. These bank notes could be exchanged then for silver and gold. In 1820, there were 327 of these banks located in commercial centers. By 1858, the year of the story in discussion, there were 1,422 banks (1). Think about that. Over 1,400 different printed bills. The images at the top of this post are examples from this time period. The banks took their business seriously and in doing so produced some beautiful and elaborate notes.

However, it stands to reason if you were a merchant in Montgomery, Alabama, you may not want to accept payment in bills from a bank, for example, in New Jersey. Banks were (are) businesses and some were (are) better than others. Taking a bank’s note was akin to investing in them. If they failed, you were out the money. Customers, then, would have to exchange their own bank notes for notes accepted in that region. Prior to the creation of the national banking system and a common US paper currency, an entire industry was needed to not only support local businesses but to enable commerce to happen between distance places. This was the time period that gave birth to American banking household names from Wells Fargo and American Express.

Fun fact, until 1857, Spanish dollars and other foreign coins were accepted as part of the American money system!

References:

  1. https://eh.net/encyclopedia/antebellum-banking-in-the-united-states/
  2. https://www.history.com/news/8-things-you-may-not-know-about-american-money
  3. https://www.aba.com/about-us/our-story/aba-history/1850-1899

Image Links (Some are for sale!)

Canal Bank New Orleans: https://www.moderncoinmart.com/1850s-20-note-canal-bank-new-orleans-pmg-68-superb-gem-unc.html

Citizen’s Bank of Louisiana: https://www.ebay.com/itm/313152653881

Sussex Bank of New Jersey: https://www.ebay.com/itm/222827844643

A Great Spot on a Great Lake: South Haven, MI

One of the fun things about being an author is exploring new places and then bringing those places to life on a page. People who live there or visited get a little thrill recognizing the places they came to cherish. People new to the places get to explore and make a new entry to their bucket list. In the 3rd book of the Diamond series, Diamond tracks a witness to the lake town of South Haven, Michigan. South Haven is located at the mouth of the Black River and Lake Michigan. Her +/- 4,400 residents love everything water, beach, and fishing. According to the LindyLou captain, South Haven has been a vacation spot for Midwesterners since the 1800s. The LindyLou is a river launch, one of the boats operated by the Michigan Maritime museum, and replicates the type of boat that carried vacationers from the large ships of the Great Lakes up the Black River to one of the many resorts.

South Haven is a town people live in as well as visit. Walking the neighborhoods along the lake, the architecture ranged from Victorian homes dating to the late 1800s to small cabins to high end homes. An excellent example of the Victorian style is the Yelton Manor Bed and Breakfast. From the detailing around the doors and windows to the arrangement of the rooms, it was easy to appreciate the art and craftsmanship from the days gone by. Many of the residents take extreme pride in their landscaping. An August walk bloomed with vibrant flowers and feathery grasses. The lakefront from Dyckman Beach to North Beach is made for playing with soft and thick sand. The public beaches made access easy and welcoming to every age group. We tended to go to the lake in the evening, watching the display of colors over the open water, then ending with ice cream at North Beach.

Everything about water fascinates me and that includes our human engineering of it. The Dyckman Street Bascule Gate opens twice an hour to allow taller boats to cross between the upstream of the Black River and the lake side. I could have watched the bridge go up and down for hours! The sidewalks on either side are narrow and are intended to be one way to manage foot traffic. That was not adhered to in our stay. The scene reminded us of the swing bridge over the River Ness in Fort Augustus, Scotland. It was odd how we could place buildings in South Haven in nearly the same positions as in Scotland. Of course, the buildings didn’t match. A restaurant in one place was a grocery store in the other. The parallels were unexpected.

A favorite thing of mine when traveling is when things don’t go quite right. That is where the stories are! Unfortunately, there was little that didn’t go well with our South Haven adventure. A small problem was my husband forgot the book he was reading at home. Easy to solve as Yelton Manor claims 33 years of books for the borrowing. Exploration of two building and about 12 rooms with books tucked everywhere revealed…NO FICTION! Not a mystery, thriller, or romance to be found. Now, if we wanted to learn magic or explore “pausitivity” we would have been good. Instead, we found a book store – Black River Books. As he finished the book, we left the book in the room, contributing the 1st fiction book to Yelton’s extensive collection.

So what will fit into Diamond’s 3rd book? Yelton Manor is the model for my fictional Spring Rose Manor. The suite we stayed in will be Diamond’s. The public marina behind the Michigan Maritime Museum is the launching point for a boat chase. And the bascule gate will be privotal (punny!), I’m just not sure how I’m going to use that yet. Check back in February 2023 when Pyscho Therapy releases.

Doing the Back Stroke under the Sturgeon Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

Where I wish I was a fish because it’s too damn hot. A wolf (or at least this wolff) was not built for August.

This month we are finding reasons to celebrate August, laughing at ourselves, playing with fish, and looking forward to the next season of Mysteries to Die For



The August Moon is the Sturgeon Moon, named for the time when the delicious fish are bountiful. While fisherman may delight, for the rest of us, August can feel like a long, sweltering desert between the holiday oasis of Independence and Labor day. Our favorite source, The Farmer’s Almanac, relieves the tedium with holidays you can celebrate.

8th: Sneak some Zucchini on your Neighbor’s Porch Day. (A joy for some, a punishment for others)

10th: National S’mores Day (Marshmellow lovers unite!)

11th: Presidential Joke Day (I thought that was everyday…😊)

13th: Left-Handers Day (Only 12% of people are southpaws and, yes, I’m one. So was DaVinci))

14th: National Creamsicle Day (Unexpected. I like it.)

15th: Relaxation Day. (Dang, I could have used that one.)

18th: Bad Poetry Day (I resemble this holiday)

22nd: National Tooth Fairy Day (That’s today!!)

26th: Dog Appreciation Day (That is definitely everyday in our house)

27th: Just Because Day (Goovy)

28th: Race your Mouse Day (Who?….and Why???)

29th: More Herbs, Less Salt Day (Just a reminder that salt is a sodium is dietarily necessary. And yummy)

So pick one and celebrate like it’s going out of style


Mystery lovers! The 2nd in my Diamond series, Suicide Squeeze, is available.

Diamond wanted ten minutes of peace and quiet. She got an incessant doorbell pressed by a gorgeous blonde holding a note compelling Diamond’s help. The blonde had a story, the “no one believes my perfect husband’s been kidnapped” kind. Eyeroll. Diamond slid the safety on the gun and climbed out of the bathtub. Dying would have to wait. Put Suicide Squeeze on the top of your reading stack. From your favorite book seller.

Shortcut to Amazon: Suicide Squeeze


Down the Rabbit Hole: I Don’t Care If You Are Saving The World…

This month I’ve been working on a scene in Diamond’s third mystery (working title Psycho Therapy) where a victim was killed while he was playing an online video game. I’m not a gamer. If I were, I doubt I’d have seven books and a podcast out. So, when I needed insight on the life of gamers – specifically on how much someone you were playing with online would hear. I turned to Subject Matter Experts: my family. Jack, my piano player and podcast producer, turned me on to videos where behind the scenes people stole the show. Yes, it was mostly mothers. It seems we, as a group, all tend to yell to our children without having any idea what they are really doing. The link below is to the first video Jack showed me and it is my favorite. Be a little patient through the set up…it’s worth it. ETA 5 Minutes to Bedtime Boys


Fun with Fish

Let’s celebrate the sturgeon moon with a fishy game. Use the clues to solve for the word. In each answer is the word fish…or rather the letters F, I, S, and H. (Scroll to the bottom for answers)

Someone who works 11p to 7a works the night _________

Oysters, crabs and mussels are type of _____________

My teenage son still has trouble _____________ the toilet

Someone who thinks only of themselves is ___________

The piece of metal between the chimney and roofing is the ____


Pocket Curiosity: East LaPort Footbridge, Plymouth Indiana


Welcome to Mysteries to Die For

Mysteries to Die For. Season 3: Enter the Detective

Mysteries To Die For is BACK!

Mark your calendars for Friday, September 10. Season 3 begins with an adaptation of Edgar Allan Poe’s The Purloined Letter. This season is titled Enter the Detective. Each of the 11 episodes features the first case of a detective who went on to an illustrious career. Some you know by a single word: Holmes, Poirot, Chan. Others may be new to you but were cutting edge and set the standard for our modern day detectives.

New to podcasts? An easy way to start is through my website. Click PODCAST


Mysteries and thrillers from mainstream publishers leave you feeling like you kissed your best friend?

Then you are ready to step down to Down & Out Books.

Mystery, thrillers and true crime. Gritty. Hard core. Obscure. Twisted. Imaginative. Fantastic. Stories the way you like them.

Discover your next amazing read at Downandoutbooks.com and your favorite social media site.


Stay cool, my friends, until we meet under September’s Harvest Moon


Fun with Fish: The Answers

Someone who works 11p to 7a works the night SHIFt

Oysters, crabs and mussels are type of SHellFIsh

My teenage son still has trouble FluSHIng the toilet

Someone who thinks only of themself is SelFIsH

The piece of metal between the chimney and roofing is the FlaSHIng

Fun with Fish

The August full moon is known as the Sturgeon Moon in some parts. Here is a puzzle that is all about fun with fish. Use the clues to solve for the word. In each answer is the word fish…or rather the letters F, I, S, and H.

Someone who works 11p to 7a works the night _________

Oysters, crabs and mussels are type of _____________

My teenage son still has trouble _____________ the toilet

Someone who thinks only of themself is _____________

The piece of metal between the chimney and roofing is the ____

Answers posted soon or email me at tina at tgwolff dot com

Pocket Curiosity: East LaPort Footbridge, Plymouth Indiana

Hidden amid the lush green on the banks of the Yellow River in Plymouth, Indiana is a footbridge. This bridge was constructed in 1898 by the Rochester Bridge Company, according to it’s Wikipedia page, and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. What qualifies this bridge was a pocket curiosity? It is a truss bridge that moves with you. I’ll confess I’m not sure if it is supposed to do that, but in the spirit of what bends doesn’t break, the bridge translates the energy of your steps into a bounce and a sway. Get twenty people walking across it at once and you have an unpassible sobriety test. This bridge recently won a grant competition and will be getting a facelift.