Traveling under the Worm(hole) Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

Spring has sprung! Okay, maybe it’s more like Spring is starting to spring. I’ve been doing a lot of thinking this month, but none of it’s about the stuff I’m supposed to think about. Now I’m pulling you into the fantastical madness of time travel, under the worm(hole) moon. Put on your imagination hats and hold on tight! TG



The worm moon is full at 2:50 P.M. EDT on Sunday, March 28, 2021. As you know, my dear readers, the full moons have many names, owning to many Native Nations. I wasn’t going to go with the worm moon, even though our favorite resource, the Farmer’s Almanac does, simply because worms are icky. They are. Yes, yes, they are the super stars of gardens and the earth, but they are still icky. You have to admit, Eagle Moon, Wind Strong Moon, Crow Comes Back Moon, and Sore Eyes Moon are much more appealing.

But I’m sticking with Worm Moon because of a conversation I had with my friend James that I can not get out of my head. It was about time travel and, well, wormholes.


Down the Rabbit WormHole: Time Travel, not just for physicists

Illustration of meshy wormhole model

As I said, earlier this month, a conversation over the best glass of fresh squeezed orange juice I have ever had (Nellies Restaurant) had me thinking about time travel day after day after day. If you really want to get into the nuts and bolts of time travel, you literally have to be a physicist.

The physicist everyone has heard of, Albert Einstein, was one of the many who have contemplated the concept of an unconventional vehicle to crossing time and space. In 1935, Einstein and Nathan Rosen used the theory of general relativity to build on an idea originally conceived in 1916 by Ludwig Flamm. The idea was a shortcut could connect two different points in space-time. The shortcut is called a wormhole. The image shows space-time bending over itself and a wormhole forming between the two planes. What goes in one end at a point and time, comes out at a different one. Here is some reading on wormholes for satisfying that curiosity I know you have.

Now, let’s leave the physics to the PhDs and talk about the kind of time-travel where all you need is an imagination. There are so, so, so many stories about time travel because it is just fascinating. Rules of time travel are bound only by imaginations and provide a near endless topic of conversation of the “cans & can’ts”, “what ifs”, and “but thens”.

In my mind, if you were to consider “real” time travel, I think the time traveler could only go forward. Picture two space-time lines, one moving three times as fast as the other. A person stepping from the slow line to the fast line, staying for 12 months, and then stepping back would appear to have been done for 4 months. Conversely, a person stepping from the fast line to the slow line, staying for 12 months, and then stepping back would have missed 36 months. Every step is lateral and moves forward from there. The rate at which time moves may vary from planet to planet, galaxy to galaxy, etc., but it always moves forward. Why? Because of nature tends to disorder. This rule, called entropy, says that without a sustained input of energy, things rot, decay, fall apart, stop. So once something dies, changes, ends-that’s it. Game over. Reversing time may be imaginable but buildings standing themselves back up and bodies un-decomposing are not.

The image at the top shows space-time folding over on itself, as though it were a fabric where every stitch, once made, stays forever.

I don’t buy that.

I picture it more as comets that exists in space-time for an instant and moves on to the next, new instant. You can’t go backwards because backwards doesn’t exist anymore. You can’t go forwards because it doesn’t exist yet. You can go between to lines, stepping from one reality to another reality

I can suspend my own rules long enough to enjoy a good story, so let’s talk about the good and the bad of time traveling movies. As my younger son and I are re-watching the Marvel Universe, End Game is on the top of my mind. I enjoyed the way the team went back to get the infinity stones and yes, in fact, changed time. I’m dying to know where Loki will pop back up. I’m a superfan of the troublemaker. I had issues with the “unsnap” logic, but was cool with the time travel.

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban used the Time-Turner to get Hermione to class on time. The use of time travel there was fine. When they used it at the end (spoiler) with the patronus, there I had more issues. Harry claims to have gotten the confidence to do the advanced spell because he had, in fact, done it before, think it was his father. He did not, in fact, do it before because he wasn’t there before. It would have been a case of spontaneous patronus combustion the first time. Nope. A swing and a miss.

Back to the Future is now a classic and it’s hard to argue with time travel in a DeLorean. I like how this one didn’t attempt to not change the future, avoiding all the trickery of not being seen, etc. Marty meddling makes the future McFly’s life much better. (Yeah, happy ending.) It could have easily have gone the other way. I had no problem with the sequencing and logic of this one.

Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Comedies seem to do the best of time travel. Maybe its because the story lines are fairly simple, which makes it less likely to violate the rules they create. Undoubtedly, the lives of Napoleon and Socrates would have forever been changed by their expedition to the future, but that’s not part of the story, so we can suspend disbelief and just have a good laugh.

The original Terminator is one that will keep you thinking for days. The terminator is sent back to kill the mother of the man who is a political enemy in the future. Simple enough. The man sent back to protect the woman from the terminator…is the one who fathers the boy. Issues! How did the boy exist the first time if the man-father wasn’t even a glimmer in his own daddy’s eye? If the terminators are so smart, why didn’t they figure out that the way to stop the boy from being born was TO STAY HOME? Obviously, I have issues with this one.

And, finally, Superman (the one with Christopher Reeves). Lois Lane dies and, in his grief, Superman flies around the earth, counter to our normal spin, to reverse the spin of the world, and thereby time. Events thereby undo themselves and, voila, Lois lives. WHAT!?!?! How about how everything comes to a cataclysmic end when the world stops f-ings spinning!!!!

Now it’s your turn. Tell me how time travel works in your universe and what you loved and hated about time travel movies. tina@tgwolff.com.


Wormhole, the word game

Use a wormhole (short cut) to drop letters into a word from Autumn to make a new a word from Spring. Keep the first and last letter, change the rest. For example: The best part of fall TO A first flower of spring. Answer ColorS to CrocuS

Answers are at the end

Cotton that keeps you comfy TO a pollinator’s weapon: ________ TO ___________

Jack-o-lanterns TO what seeds grow into: _______ TO _________

Overnight ice crystals TO where seeds are found: ______ TO __________


Mysteries to Die For. Season 2: The Originators

Mysteries to Die For combines storytelling and original music to put you in the heart of murder, mystery, and mayhem. This season features adaptations of some of the first stories to be considered mysteries. Episodes drop every other Friday.

New to podcasts? An easy way to start is through my website. Click PODCAST

S2 E5a Sergeant Cuff and the Moonstone Conspiracy Drops April 2

It was a thing of legends. Taken, then hidden. Given, then stolen. Suspicion reigns above and below the stairs. Sgt. Cuff steps into the chaos, charged with recovering the famed Moonstone Diamond.   

An adaptation of The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. Part 1.

S2 E5b Franklin Blake Returns Drops Friday April 16

Franklin Blake left England because the woman he loved blamed him for the loss of the fabled Moonstone Diamond. He returned to finish the job Sgt. Cuff started and, more importantly, win back the girl.

An adaptation of The Moonstone by Wilkie Collins. Part 2.


Down & Out Books is the publisher of my mystery series and supports Mysteries to Die For. Check out these new releases on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, indiebound and ask for them at your favorite book store.


In the city of Carcasa, gunshots devastate the night as a patrol officer makes a traffic stop. The occupants—three dealers caught in the act of muling—set into motion a course of actions that can only end badly. Now, one is dead, another fleeing on foot and the third tearing through neighborhoods in a bumper car-style chase. Furious, grief-stricken officers on their heels with their brother fighting for his life on the side of a road.

The shooter escapes, and the PD begins their hunt to find the shooter before he lucks out, fades into memory. With what information they have, they dig; the dirt that is the shooter’s life getting thrown over their shoulders by the shovel-full. Family, friends, employment, any avenue of refuge for him begins to burn. Things get complicated along the way. The kind of complicated that goes into a body bag. The art of flushing out the enemy is a sacred practice, best done with smoldering rage.

But, after a man has nowhere to hide, having him out in the open might be worse.

Amazon link is here. Ryan’s Goodreads is here


From ALL DUE RESPECT, an imprint of Down & Out Books

Dominick Prince has been a magnet for trouble his entire life. A series of poor life choices and their violent consequences have crushed his spirit. Desperate to outrun this burgeoning rage before it fully consumes him, Dominick accepts an offer he doesn’t trust from an old high school classmate. Dutchy Kent says he wants to make one last-ditch effort to prove his acting chops by mounting the New York City debut of a play based on one of Dominick’s stories, but the true story involves the real estate empire of a notorious Queens drug dealer and $1.2 million in cash. Dutchy would love to find that cash, but he needs someone else to do the dirty work, someone who attracts trouble and is easily manipulated.

Unfortunately for Dutchy, the Dominick he knew in school is gone. The Dominick who shows up at his office is bitter, twitchy, and repulsed by the trash heaps and junk yards of Long Island City that don’t fit into his vision of a New York debut. None of that matters to Dutchy though who continues with his scheme, unaware that every insult, every passive aggressive comment, and every physical intimidation pushes Dominick one step further toward his rapidly approaching breaking point.

Bryon’s Amazon link is HERE


Wormhole Answers

Cotton that keeps you comfy TO a pollinator’s weapon Answer: sweater to stinger

Jack-o-Lanterns TO what seeds grow into Answer: pumpkins to plants

Overnight ice crystals TO where seeds are found Answer: frost to fruits

See you in April for a little fun under the Pink Moon

Cozy under the Snow Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

Feburrrary has certainly lived up to it’s name this year. To keep warm and cozy, I have a few things to charge your hibernating synapses. We’ll begin gazing at the moon, of course, then dive into a true story that is crazier than fiction. Grab a pencil for a quick little puzzle before you tap into a preview of the next Mysteries to Die For. We finish up with a couple new releases from Down and Out Books. Warm thoughts! TG



The Snow Moon has lived up to its name here in Northeast Indiana. While officially not arriving until 3:17am EST on Saturday, February 27, Cold temperatures have kept the snow around, giving us the perfect winter coat. According to my favorite source, The Farmer’s Almanac, February’s moon is also knowns as the Bald Eagle or Eagle Moon (Cree), Bear Moon (Ojibwe), the Black Bear Moon (Tlingit), Raccoon Moon (Dakota), and Groundhog Moon (Algonquin).

I thought it curious to see bears in the list. This city girl thought bears hibernated in winter. According to the Almanac, this is the time when cubs are born. If cub birth is anything like child birth, there ain’t no sleeping through that!


A few more days left on the Suicide Squeeze Promotion. Click on the image to register for your chance to win a $50 Amazon Gift Card!


Down the Rabbit Hole: The Affair of Poisons

This month, researching the background for one of the Mysteries to Die For stories took me down the rabbit hole of French history. Check out this crazy sh*t: the “affair of poisons” was a twist of murder, conspiracy, alchemy, and witchcraft. It started with the 1675 trial of Marie Madeleine Marguerite d’Aubray, Marquise of Brinvilliers, accused of conspiring with her lover in the poisoning of her father nine years prior and two of her brothers five years prior. She later confessed under torture and was sentenced to death. (Her lover had died of natural causes some years before her arrest.) The trial was sensational and had all of Paris’ aristocracy talking…talking about other mysterious deaths. People got nervous, even King Louis XIV. Paris Police Chief Gabriel Nicolas de la Reynie was given the job of getting to the bottom of things.

The unraveling began with the arrest of a woman, Magdelaine de la Grange, on charges of forgery and murder. La Grange cut a deal, not so different from today, and gave information on other high crimes in exchange for her life. In Paris, there was a black market for poisons, impossible to detect, to aid in securing early inheritances and cleaning up family matters. The fortune tellers and alchemists of Paris were rounded up by the chief of the Paris police. Several confessed under torture and gave up some very connected names in the highest circles.

The name most associated with the affair of poisons was midwife Catherine Deshayes Monvoisin, referred to as La Voisin. Incriminated by a poisoner, La Voisin herself implicated several courtiers- which is to say companions or advisors to a king or queen. Her declarations were especially noteworthy because they included King Louis XIV’s lover Madame de Montespan, mother of 7 of his 9 children.

The Paris Police Chief La Reynie established a special court, the Chamber Ardente (the burning court), to judge the cases. The king eventually disbanded the court reportedly to avoid the risk of scandal. A quote from Reynie showed what he thought of it all: the enormity of the crimes proved their safeguard. (The 17th Century equivalent of a bail out?)

Are you ready for the crazy? By the numbers, the Affair of the Poison implicated 442 suspects. A total of 367 arrests were issued and 218 carried out. Of those found guilty, 36 were executed, 23 exiled, and 5 sentenced to the galleys (rowing for the French navy). Some people were punished without a trial. A total of 65 men and women were imprisoned for life at different Chateaus and other places. Others died in police custody by torture or suicide. An unreported number were imprisoned or committed to mental institutions by their families disgraced by the offender. And we thought 2020 was nuts (ok, it was, even by 17th Century Parisian standards). Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affair_of_the_Poisons


SNOW BALL

Begin with the word SNOW, then roll it around by changing 1 letter and rearranging to create the defined word. Example: that thing two inches in front of you: NOSE (SNOW – W + R)

Answers are at the end

Let’s Start! SNOW

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning a graceful white bird: ________

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning to fade way: ________

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning Pig Pen’s antithesis: ________

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning a pleasant sound: _______

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning to go all in: ______

Change 1 letter and rearrange for a word meaning what we all hope to be at the end of 2021: _____


Mysteries to Die For. Season 2: The Originators

Mysteries to Die For combines storytelling and original music to put you in the heart of murder, mystery, and mayhem. This season features adaptations of some of the first stories to be considered mysteries. Episodes drop every other Friday.

New to podcasts? An easy way to start is through my website. Click PODCAST

S2 E3 The Human Affect Drops Friday March 5

Every man has a guilty pleasure, his was haunted houses. Our detective had seen through smoke and mirrors to the human hand before. Now he’s turning his talents on the home were the housekeeper died with her eyes open.

An adaptation of The House and The Haunters by Edward Bulwer-Lytton

S2E4 T. Sawyer, Esquire Drops Friday March 19

They say poor old Uncle Silas kilt that ornery Jubiter Dunlap, be we know he didn’t have nothing to do with it. Our lawyer ain’t worth nothin’. Not to worry. With Tom Sawyer on the case, the real killers ain’t getting away.

An adaptation of Tom Sawyer, Detective by Mark Twain


Down & Out Books is the publisher of my mystery series and supports Mysteries to Die For. Check out these new releases on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and ask for them at your favorite book store.


Midnight Lullaby by James D.F. Hannah

AVAILABLE NOW

A missing woman. A suitcase full of drug money. An ex-cop with nothing to lose.

A roadside shooting ended both his career and his marriage and sent ex-state trooper Henry Malone back to his childhood home in Serenity, West Virginia. A request to look into the disappearance of a young mother becomes a second chance, an opportunity to redeem himself.

But Malone finds the unexpected as he scratches beneath his hometown’s surface: Crooked lawyers. Meth cooks. A hair-triggered sheriff. A beautiful legal secretary. And a seductive yet deadly white supremacist. It is a dangerous mix that leads Henry and his well-armed AA sponsor, Woody, down onto a wild and deadly road. A missing-persons case becomes the struggle for both men just to stay alive.

D&O is reissuing James Hannah’s award winning Henry Malone Series over the course of a year. Jump in now to keep up with the twists and turns that keep Malone on his toes.

Amazon: www.amazon.com/gp/product/B08SMP3T1P


State of Shock by M. Todd Henderson

Available Now

When Jante Turner is murdered just days before she takes the mantle as new dean of Rockefeller University Law School in Chicago, Royce Johnson is approached to help solve the murder. Recently released from prison, the ex-FBI agent has his own problems. Still, he takes the job.

Soon, Johnson finds himself at the intersection of higher education, Chicago politics, big money, and murder. Johnson traces a river of corruption running from deep-pocket donors of the University to North Side developers and a South Side alderman who is heir to the throne in City Hall. In his desperation, he turns to the one lawyer who can help him—the former Rockefeller student whom Johnson mistakenly framed for murder on his last case.

Amazon: State of Shock


Look out for the Next Edition of
On the Prowl

March 28, at which point we should be into the “lamb” part of the month


Snowball Answers

A word meaning a graceful white bird: SWAN

A word meaning to fade way: WANE

A word meaning Pig Pen’s antithesis: NEAT

A word meaning a pleasant sound: TONE

A word meaning to go all in: ANTE

A word meaning what we all hope to be at the end of 2021: SANE


Howling under the Wolf Moon

Welcome to On the Prowl.

This wolf has a lot to howl about this month. A new book release. Season 2 of our podcast drops. And it’s not 2020 anymore. To entertain you, I have a deep dive into something you touch about 10 times a day, a little word play, and ways to keep your mind sharp.



The Full Wolf Moon rises on Thursday, January 28. According to our favorite source, The Farmers Almanac, January’s moon was named after the wolf because so many were heard on those crisp, cold nights. People used to think the wolves howled because they were hungry (said the hungry people trying not to think about food). Scientists now know that wolves howl for many reasons including communications, finding pack members, and marking territory. My wolffs howl whenever I sing “their music” or make really awesome mom jokes.


Silver Dagger is organizing a book tour for my new release, Suicide Squeeze. Bloggers interested in joining in, click on the image to go to the signup page or email me at tina at tgwolff dot com.


Old School Hardware

For The Thinking Man, the first story in this season of Mysteries to Die For, I went down the rabbit hole of 19th Century windows and doors. You would think I would need to study topics more in line with 19th Century medical practices or policing technologies, but no. One of the compelling things about mysteries is that they are set in ordinary places, in ordinary times. And, of course, times do change and so there are times, such as this one, where a little due diligence into our past is necessary.

The Thinking Man is an adaptation of the Poe classic The Murders in the Rue Morgue. At its essence, the story is one of dead body inside a room with the windows and doors locked from the inside. The mystery comes from the idea that the door couldn’t have been locked from the inside if said people inside were dead.

In our modern world, the fact of a body inside a locked room may not create a mystery. Now, many doors lock automatically when they close regardless of who went out it- killer, the mailman, a toddler. Our door at my office locks automatically and, yes, I’ve locked myself out a time or three. But, in the 1800s, this auto locking technology hadn’t been invented. Door latches ranged from simple levers to the first “rim lock” style. Architectural Observer has two blogs on the topic. Part 1 is 1800-1850. Part 2 is 1850-1900. Both have several pictures of different door latches from 1800s houses here in the States.  While the latches could be highly ornate and decorative, they were still simple. Doors locked with a key. If the people inside locked the door, they had to have had a hand on the key to do it. And so, were alive at the time the door was locked.

Window technology has changed, too, with the lifting and locking mechanisms advancing. In the 1800s, the frames windows sat in had pulley wheels at the top. On both side of the window, chain or rope was fastened that went over the pulley and was connected to a counterweight that was concealed within the frame. With weight of the window balanced, the counterweights made the windows easy to slide up and down. These window systems are still around in older homes. We had these in our old house in Cleveland, which was built in 1920. They were very easy to open, from the inside or the outside, and did little to keep out winter. To prevent people who were, literally, on the outside from opening them, thick pins slid into the frame and prevented the window from lifting. With the pins in place, the window would break or the frame shatter before that pin would give way. And so, again, we have the mystery of a pin having to be inserted by a living person on the inside of the window.

Now you are ready to dive into The Murders in the Rue Morgue or listen to my adaptation, The Thinking Man.


DEAD OF WINTER

Keep your mind warm and nimble
make up words short and simple
or long and hard if that’s your way
to add more fun into your day

If my rhyme didn’t do it for you, here it is in prose: make as many words as you can out of the letters in DEAD OF WINTER


Mysteries to Die For. Season 2: The Originators

Mysteries to Die For combines storytelling and original music to put you in the heart of murder, mystery, and mayhem. This season features adaptations of some of the first stories to be considered mysteries. Episodes begin dropping Friday, February 5.

S2 E1 The Thinking Man Drops Friday 2/5/2021

Two women living a peaceful life. Two women spending an evening in their third floor flat. Two women dead. The doors are locked from the inside, the windows are closed. One man knows who the killer is and how he got in. The thinking man.

An adaptation of The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe

S2 E2 Desperate Times Drops Friday 2/19/21

Everyone liked George. So the story went. The evidence was to the contrary. The bank vault was open, the money was stolen, and George was dead. The authorities come up empty and a reward didn’t help. Those were desperate times.

An adaptation of The Somnambulist and the Detective by Allan Pinkerton


Down & Out Books is the publisher of my mystery series and supports Mysteries to Die For. Check out these new releases on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and ask for them at your favorite book store.


Releasing February 5

Diamond is back in her second
fast-paced
high octane
raven hunting
adventure mystery

Secrets are like dead men, best kept cold and buried

Diamond. One name for a woman with one purpose. Or she was, until she finished her to-do list. Now she’s just a woman ready to be over with it all.

Hanna Lang is the kind of woman men write bad checks for. She has a problem. Her man, Dr. Damon Marten, disappeared in the middle of an ordinary day. The police aren’t concerned but Hanna knows better. A clandestine meeting leaves her with an address, a sealed envelope, and one last hope. An hour later, she rings a doorbell.

Before Diamond was a widow, she was CIA agent with skills illegal in a dozen countries. When her marker is called in, she has no choice but to listen. It’s just like fate throw her a curve ball, sending her the one problem she can’t walk away from. Hanna’s situation is virtually identical to her own with one exception: Hanna’s man might still be alive.

Diamond reluctantly takes the case. She dives into the mystery, surfacing in the middle of a scavenger hunt for a secret known as Poe’s Raven. It takes Diamond’s flair for the impossible to capture this bird, only to discover what’s in her hand has the potential to take terrorism to a chilling new level. And fate isn’t done with Diamond, forcing her to put it all on the line or risk setting the caged bird free.


The Great Filling Station Hold Up Edited by Josh Pachter Available Feb 22

Jimmy Buffett is one of the great contemporary singer/songwriters, and it’s hard to imagine a citizen of Planet Earth unfamiliar with such classic hits as “Margaritaville.” Jimmy has also written novels, children’s books, memoirs, and a stage musical based on Herman Wouk’s Don’t Stop the Carnival, and his family-friendly concerts almost always sell out to audiences comprised of a mix of dedicated Parrotheads, casual fans, and newbies.

In The Great Filling Station Holdup, editor Josh Pachter presents sixteen short crime stories by sixteen popular and up-and-coming crime writers, each story based on a song from one of the twenty-eight studio albums Jimmy has released over the last half century, from Leigh Lundin’s take on “Truckstop Salvation” (which appeared on Jimmy’s first LP, 1970’s Down to Earth) to M.E. Browning’s interpretation of “Einstein Was a Surfer” (from Jimmy’s most recent recording, 2013’s Songs from St. Somewhere).

If you love Jimmy’s music or crime fiction or both, you’ll love The Great Filling Station Holdup. Mix yourself a boat drink, ask Alexa to put on a buffet of Buffett tunes, kick back, and enjoy!


Look out for the Next Edition of
On the Prowl

February 27 in the silence of a winter night, the Snow Moon will be high overhead.


Now Available: De La Cruz Case File #2 – Driving Reign

The woman in the stingy hospital bed wasn’t dead. The question for Detective Jesus De La Cruz: did the comatose patient narrowly survive suicide or murder?

Faithful friends paint a picture of a guileless young woman, a victim of both crime and society. Others describe a cold woman with a proclivity for icing interested men with a single look.

Beneath the rhetoric, Cruz unearths a twisted knot of reality and perception. A sex scandal, a jilted lover, a callous director, a rainmaker, and a quid pro quo have Cruz questioning if there is such a thing as an innocent man. Truth is a strong rope, tied in a noose. As he closes in, the knot tightens, but who will pay the price? A killer or a member of Cruz’s own family?

Available upon request from your local book seller and from these on-line retailers:

Down & Out | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound | iTunes | Kobo | Google Play

Now Available: Diamond Series #2 – Suicide Squeeze

Diamond is back in a new Jane Bond meets Deadpool mystery…

Diamond. One name for a woman with one purpose. Or she was, until she finished her to-do list. Now she’s just a woman ready to be over with it all.

Hanna Lang is the kind of woman men write bad checks for. She has a problem. Her man, Dr. Damon Marten, disappeared in the middle of an ordinary day. The police aren’t concerned but Hanna knows better. A clandestine meeting leaves her with an address, a sealed envelope, and one last hope. An hour later, she rings a doorbell.

Before Diamond was a widow, she was CIA agent with skills illegal in a dozen countries. When her marker is called in, she has no choice but to listen. It’s just like fate throw her a curve ball, sending her the one problem she can’t walk away from. Hanna’s situation is virtually identical to her own with one exception: Hanna’s man might still be alive.

Diamond reluctantly takes the case. She dives into the mystery, surfacing in the middle of a scavenger hunt for a secret known as Poe’s Raven. It takes Diamond’s flair for the impossible to capture this bird, only to discover what’s in her hand has the potential to take terrorism to a chilling new level. And fate isn’t done with Diamond, forcing her to put it all on the line or risk setting the caged bird free.

Available upon request from your local book seller and from these on-line retailers:

Down & Out | Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound | iTunes | Kobo | Google Play

Podcast: Mysteries to Die For

Mysteries to Die For is my podcast that combines storytelling with original music to put you at the heart of mystery, murder, and mayhem. Some will be my own, others will be classics that helped shape the mystery genre we know today. 

For a full listing of episodes, click HERE.